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The Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development (JIID) is a Biannual (Semi-Annual), Multidisciplinary, Peer-Reviewed, Open Access Journal published from the Centre for Earth Studies, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi.

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Published by:
Centre for Earth Studies,
Room No. 205,
New Academic Block
Indraprastha College for Women
31 Sham Nath Marg
Delhi – 110054, INDIA

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Release of Volume 2, Issue 1
Release of Volume 1, Issue 1

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Importance of Field Studies in Environmental Education: An Experience from Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan

First Author Affiliation: Department of Environmental Studies, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi; Second and Third Author Affiliation: Department of Political Science, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi.

 

 

How to Cite:

MPA:
Tiwary, Nawin K, Debina Moirangthem and G. Kaur. “Importance of Field Studies in Environmental Education: An Experience from Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan”. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 2.1 (2017): 54-55.

APA:
Tiwary, N.K., Moirangthem, D., & Kaur, G. (2017). Importance of Field Studies in Environmental Education: An Experience from Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 2(1), 54-55.

Chicago:
Tiwary, Nawin K, Debina Moirangthem and G Kaur. “Importance of Field Studies in Environmental Education: An Experience from Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan”. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 2, no. 1, (2017): 54-55.

Haravrd:
Tiwary, N.K, Moirangthem, D. And Kaur, G. Importance of Field Studies in Environmental Education: An Experience from Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 2(1), pp. 54-55.

Vancouver:
Tiwary NK, Moirangthem D, Kaur G. Importance of Field Studies in Environmental Education: An Experience from Keoladeo National Park, Rajasthan. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2017; 2(1):54-55.

Views: 57

Foreword

Patron, Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development – JIID & Principal, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi.

 

The Centre for Earth Studies, founded in 2016 by IP College, reflects its ongoing engagement with the state of our being and becoming, as inhabitants of Planet Earth. The Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development has been envisaged as an integral part of the Centre’s activities. Conceptualized by the colleagues of the Department of Environmental Studies, the objective of the Journal is to produce a confluence of thoughts and ideas as well as the best practices prevalent in individual and institutional systems which speak to us of sustainability. The first issue presented here consists of invited research contributions. The subsequent issues will carry peer-reviewed articles.

Grateful thanks are owed to Dr. Govind Singh, Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Studies, for his untiring efforts to uphold quality and create something of enduring value, in the form of this Journal. The College also thanks Dr. Anindita Roy Saha, Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and Teacher in Charge, Department of Environmental Studies. As the Coordinator of the Centre for Earth Studies, it is her unstinting support and encouragement which has made implementation of novel ideas and initiatives like this Journal possible.

 

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Views: 2389

Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030: Easier Stated Than Achieved

Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA: 
Singh, Govind. “Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030: Easier Stated Than Achieved.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 1-2. 
APA: 
Singh, G. (2016). Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030: Easier Stated Than Achieved. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 1-2. 
Chicago: 
Singh, Govind. “Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030: Easier Stated Than Achieved.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 1-2. 
Harvard: 
Singh, G. 2016. Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030: Easier Stated Than Achieved. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 1-2. 
Vancouver: 
Singh G. Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030: Easier Stated Than Achieved. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. Aug 22;1(1):1-2.

Views: 1570

MGNREGA as an Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand

First Author Affiliation: Department of Economics, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi. Second Author Affiliation: Department of Environmental Studies, University of Delhi.

 

Abstract: Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGA) is a widely practiced policy of the Government of India in the area of rural employment generation and poverty alleviation. While it has clear economic objectives, it also has a host of environmental benefits. Proper implementation of the scheme can generate a stream of economic, ecological and environmental services. The present study covers three villages of the state Uttarakhand which lies in the midst of the Himalayas. These small, medium and large sized rural areas have gained significantly by MGNREGA. The MGNREGA works have generated employment and income, improved connectivity and reduced migration to urban areas in search of jobs. On the other hand, there have been distinct improvements in the standards of sanitation, resource use, water conservation, etc. However, there is considerable scope in the MGNREGA for improvement in terms of efficiency, institutional support, policy formulation and implementation. The paper brings forward the dual – economic and environmental – benefits of MGNREGA and also highlights improvements which can make it one of the largest and most productive rural employment scheme with significant environmental benefits.

Keywords: MGNREGA, rural development, poverty, employment, environment, energy.

 

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How to Cite:

MPA: 
Saha, Anindita R and Pankaj Bhatt. “MGNREGA as an Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 3-10. 
APA: 
Saha, A.R., & Bhatt, P. (2016). MGNREGA as an Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 3-10. 
Chicago: 
Saha, Anindita R and Pankaj Bhatt. “MGNREGA as an Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 3-10. 
Harvard: 
Saha, A., Bhatt, P. 2016. MGNREGA as an Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 3-10. 
Vancouver: 
Saha AR, Bhatt P. MGNREGA as an Environmental Policy: A Case Study of Pithoragarh, Uttarakhand. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):3-10.

Views: 979

Sustainability Appraisal and Economic Valuation of North Delhi Ridge Using Participatory Research Approach

First Author Affiliation: Department of Environmental Studies, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi. Second, Third and Fourth Author Affiliation: Delhi Greens, P.O. Box 4855, New Delhi.

 

Abstract: Delhi Ridge is the Northern extension of the Aravalli hill range and is a prominent landscape feature of the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi. Presence of Delhi Ridge, along with River Yamuna, has been of strategic significance in the selection of Delhi as a capital city since ancient times. Modern Delhi has grown beyond the physical boundaries of the Ridge and the Yamuna. The once barren Ridge has now been transformed into a forest, which provides useful ecosystem services to Delhi. Despite the large number of benefits provided by the Delhi Ridge, the latter is under a constant threat of encroachment and degradation. This is because land is a highly priced natural resource in Delhi. The approximately 78 sq. km area of the Delhi Ridge is thus seen by many as prospective real estate and several legal and illegal structures can be found inside the Delhi Ridge. The present research contribution is an attempt to carry out sustainability appraisal of the Delhi Ridge by using the principles of environmental economics and participatory research. We focus on the North Delhi Ridge (NDR) and have carried out an economic valuation of NDR using survey based methods. A participatory-GIS approach has been followed to highlight the physical boundary of NDR along with the areas of encroachment. We find that economic value of NDR is much greater than the benefits that may be drawn by modifying its land use land cover to concrete. We also find that in the absence of existing notification on the extent of the NDR, there is rampant encroachment on its eastern and southern side.

Keywords: ecosystem services, Delhi Ridge, environmental economics, urban ecology, participatory research.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA:
Singh, Govind, et al. “Sustainability Appraisal and Economic Valuation of North Delhi Ridge Using Participatory Research Approach.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 11-19.
APA:
Singh, G., Sharma, A., Gupta, I., & Baveja, P. (2016). Sustainability Appraisal and Economic Valuation of North Delhi Ridge Using Participatory Research Approach. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 11-19.
Chicago:
Singh, Govind, et al. “Sustainability Appraisal and Economic Valuation of North Delhi Ridge Using Participatory Research Approach.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 11-19.
Harvard:
Singh, G., Sharma, A., Gupta, I., and Baveja, P. 2016. Sustainability Appraisal and Economic Valuation of North Delhi Ridge Using Participatory Research Approach. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 11-19.
Vancouver:
Singh G, Sharma A, Gupta I, Baveja P. Sustainability Appraisal and Economic Valuation of North Delhi Ridge Using Participatory Research Approach. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):11-19.

Views: 2342

Assuaging Human Health Concerns Through Analysis of Physicochemical Parameters of Potable Water Samples in Delhi

First Author Affiliation: Sensing Materials and Devices Laboratory, Acharya Narendra Dev College, University of Delhi. Second, Third and Fourth Author Affiliation: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Laboratory, Acharya Narendra Dev College,  University of Delhi.

 

Abstract: Water is a critical component for life and is an indispensable natural resource containing minerals required for human nutrition. However anthropogenic activities related to rapid industrialization, effluent discharges, overpopulation, atmospheric pollution etc. have stretched water reserves to alarming levels wherein the situation has come to a breaking point. Water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, hardness, presence of calcium, chloride, sulphate, ammonia, total dissolved solids (TDS) and magnesium are evaluated in the present study to elucidate apprehensions about potability of water being consumed in day-to-day life. Eleven water samples from areas in Delhi were investigated for the aforementioned physicochemical parameters to identify water potability issues. A few samples exhibited ultra-high values of TDS (~15,000+ mg/l) while standard value is prescribed at 2,000 mg/l by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). Water samples with high TDS values are reported to be potential harbingers of bacterial contamination. In eight of the eleven samples the hardness coefficient was found to be higher than WHO baseline value of 100 mg/l. Three samples from Faridabad, Govindpuri and Pushp Vihar had either more or values approaching BIS standard of 300 mg/l, thereby indicating that the so called potable water was unfit for human consumption. High hardness values can be conjectured to be arising from rusted water supply pipes and/ or mixing of effluents from industries running from homes.

Keywords: water quality, drinking water, turbidity, TDS, Delhi.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA: 
Chowdhuri, Arijit, et al. “Assuaging Human Health Concerns Through Analysis of Physicochemical Parameters of Potable Water Samples in Delhi.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 20-25. 
APA: 
Chowdhuri, A., Das, B. K., Singh, S., & Gupta, C. K. (2016). Assuaging Human Health Concerns Through Analysis of Physicochemical Parameters of Potable Water Samples in Delhi. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 20-25. 
Chicago: 
Chowdhuri, Arijit, et al. “Assuaging Human Health Concerns Through Analysis of Physicochemical Parameters of Potable Water Samples in Delhi.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 20-25. 
Harvard: 
Chowdhuri, A., Das, B.K., Singh, S., & Gupta, C.K. 2016. Assuaging Human Health Concerns Through Analysis of Physicochemical Parameters of Potable Water Samples in Delhi. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 20-25. 
Vancouver: 
Chowdhuri A, Das BK, Singh S, Gupta CK. Assuaging Human Health Concerns Through Analysis of Physicochemical Parameters of Potable Water Samples in Delhi. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):20-25.

Views: 474

Innovative Educational Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Inclusive Growth in India – Challenges and Lessons Learnt

First and Second Author Affiliation: Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Agra, India. Third Author Affiliation: SRF Foundation, Gurgaon, India.

 

Abstract: The Companies Act, 2013 encourages the corporate sector to devote a fraction of their profits to enable education efforts in India. This is based on the premise that not only is education beneficial in itself, but it facilitates access to economic opportunities, which helps in poverty alleviation. This paper aims to understand the challenges faced by the corporate sector in implementing CSR programmes, through a case study approach of two organisations in the diversified infrastructure and chemicals sectors.  The key findings are that stakeholder management viz. community, government and schools, is critical to success for educational CSR to succeed. The corporate sector has to look towards a holistic approach for education development in the pursuit of key learning outcomes.  The key implications for practitioners from this study are to develop new and innovative solutions to deal with multiple complexities during implementation. They need to be sensitive towards the social and cultural context of their CSR programmes. For academicians, one of the suppositions is that they help generate consciousness and appreciation of difficulties faced at the ground level by the underprivileged among students, as well as, values rooted in creating a better world for the greater common good.

Keywords: inclusive growth, education, corporate social responsibility, industry.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA: 
Bhatnagar, Purnima, Shalini Nigam, and Y. Reddy. “Innovative Educational Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Inclusive Growth in India – Challenges and Lessons Learnt.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 26-32. 
APA: 
Bhatanagar, P., Nigam, S., & Reddy, Y. (2016). Innovative Educational Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Inclusive Growth in India – Challenges and Lessons Learnt. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 26-32. 
Chicago: 
Bhatanagar, Purnima, Shalini Nigam and Y Reddy. “Innovative Educational Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Inclusive Growth in India – Challenges and Lessons Learnt.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 26-32. 
Harvard: 
Bhatanagar, P., Nigam, S. and Reddy, Y. 2016. Innovative Educational Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Inclusive Growth in India – Challenges and Lessons Learnt. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 26-32. 
Vancouver: 
Bhatanagar P, Nigam S, Reddy Y. Innovative Educational Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives for Inclusive Growth in India – Challenges and Lessons Learnt. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):26-32.

Views: 683

Climate Change Denial and Psychological Barriers to Pro-Environmental Behaviour

First Author Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi

 

Abstract: The purpose of the study is to examine the psychological barriers to environmental conservation and the dynamics of climate change denial among educated adults through focus group discussion. The participants were four young adults (18-21 years of age) and four middle aged adults (35-50 years). Through a semi-structured interview, the psychological aspects of pro-environmental behaviour and related emotions were analyzed. The various aspects explored were the preference people give to the issue of climate change as compared to other social issues, how people perceive their individual role in climate change, to what extent people are ready to bring changes in their lifestyle to address climate change, why do people do little for environment and consider it a petty issue despite widespread awareness. The data collected was transcribed and analysed through thematic analysis. This study provides critical information with respect to climate change denial and subsequently insights for encouraging pro-environmental behaviour in the Indian context.

Keywords: climate change denial, psychological barriers, pro-environmental behaviour, environmental awareness.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA: 
Garg, Shruti. “Climate Change Denial and Psychological Barriers to Pro-Environmental Behaviour.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 33-42. 
APA: 
Garg, S. (2016). Climate Change Denial and Psychological Barriers to Pro-Environmental Behaviour. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 33-42. 
Chicago: 
Garg, Shruti. “Climate Change Denial and Psychological Barriers to Pro-Environmental Behaviour.”  Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 33-42. 
Harvard: 
Garg, A. 2016. Climate Change Denial and Psychological Barriers to Pro-Environmental Behaviour. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 33-42. 
Vancouver: 
Garg S. Climate Change Denial and Psychological Barriers to Pro-Environmental Behaviour. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):33-42.

Views: 373

Kuttu (Buckwheat): A Promising Staple Food Grain for Our Diet

First and Second Author Affiliation: Department of Botany, Deshbandhu College, University of Delhi.

 

Abstract: Buckwheat is a multifarious pseudocereal with high nutritional benefits including absence of gluten, richness in water soluble fibres, presence of high quality proteins, unsaturated fatty acids and appreciable mineral and vitamin content. Buckwheat has excellent amino acid composition that is complementary to cereal grains. It is very high in lysine, having nearly twice the amount found in wheat and rice. Buckwheat seeds contain various phenols, bioflavonoids including rutin and sugar cyclitols, flavonoids which act as anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, provide protect against cardiovascular disease and treat Diabetes mellitus. Buckwheat can thus prove to be a promising grain and an important introduction in the future food basket in context of its high nutritional value.

Keywords: kuttu, pseudocereal, buckwheat, staple food.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA: 
Bhaduri, Niti P and Meenakshi Prajneshu. “Kuttu (Buckwheat): A Promising Staple Food Grain for Our Diet.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 43-45. 
APA: 
Bhaduri, N.P., & Prajneshu, M. (2016). Kuttu (Buckwheat): A Promising Staple Food Grain for Our Diet. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), 43-45. 
Chicago: 
Bhaduri, Niti P and Meenakshi Prajneshu. “Kuttu (Buckwheat): A Promising Staple Food Grain for Our Diet.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 43-45. 
Harvard: 
Bhaduri, N., Prajneshu, Meenakshi. 2016. Kuttu (Buckwheat): A Promising Staple Food Grain for Our Diet. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 43-45. 
Vancouver: 
Bhaduri NP, Prajneshu M. Kuttu (Buckwheat): A Promising Staple Food Grain for Our Diet. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):43-45.

Views: 866

Developing Community Outreach Programme for Government Schools in Delhi, India

First Author Affiliation: Department of Political Science, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi. Second Author Affiliation: Department of Hindi, Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi.

 

Abstract: The present research work focuses around the know-how and attitudinal perceptions of people in the society towards areas such as disaster management, gender sensitization and library management, especially in the fast-growing world of computers and mobiles. The research methodology selected Government school students since it is believed that students in the Government schools in India are underprivileged and are often not able to perceive education in the right manner. The research also wanted to begin with young minds, to read them, understand them and possibly mould them in a beneficial manner.

Keywords: awareness, disaster, gender, sensitization. books.

 

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How to Cite:

MLA: 
Sharma, Jyoti T and Harsh Bala Sharma. “Developing Community Outreach Programme for Government Schools in Delhi, India.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1.1 (2016): 46-47. 
APA: 
Sharma, J.T., & Sharma H.B. (2016). Developing Community Outreach Programme for Government Schools in Delhi, India. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1),  46-47. 
Chicago: 
Sharma, Jyoti T and Harsh Bala Sharma. “Developing Community Outreach Programme for Government Schools in Delhi, India.” Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development 1, no. 1 (2016): 46-47. 
Harvard: 
Sharma, J., Sharma, H.B. 2016. Developing Community Outreach Programme for Government Schools in Delhi, India. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development, 1(1), pp. 46-47. 
Vancouver: 
Sharma JT, Sharma HB. Developing Community Outreach Programme for Government Schools in Delhi, India. Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. 2016 Aug 22;1(1):46-47.

Views: 589

Aims & Objectives

JIID has been set up as a platform for researchers from all disciplines conducting innovative research for ensuring inclusive development.

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