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Volume 2, Issue No. 2, August 2017

Editorial


Waste Not, Want Not Can Also Create Sustainable Societies

Govind Singh
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 56-57

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Research Articles


Exploring the Potential of Soap Operas for Gender Equality and Sustainable Development

Abstract

Contemporary soap operas have a large but persistent viewership, especially among the women in India. This paper examines the Entertainment-Education (E-E) paradigm in communication, its theoretical underpinnings and applications of these theories for bringing about a social change. Literature on social impact generated by soaps in India and in other countries including the US has been reviewed. The case study of Balika Vadhu, a revolutionary soap themed on child marriage, is also presented. The research identifies prime time soap operas as an untapped pool of talent with potential of becoming an agent of mass education. The research also advocates for constituting national level awards for TV soaps which focus on E-E.

Divyadarshan Chandrasekar and Ameya Aatman
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 58-62

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Women at Work and Men at Home: A Transition for Sustainable Development

Abstract

The issue of women empowerment has picked up a great attention and pace in the recent years. Women stepped out of the homes and started working although they continue to juggle between paid work and unpaid work at workplace and home respectively. Even as workplaces for women have increasingly become promotive of their professional and personal development through provision of policies such as work from home, flexible shifts, maternity entitlements among others there is still time when inclusion of all women in the workforce and inclusion of all men in the “home-force” is achieved. Families have started placing value to women’s education and employment, instead of limiting them to only home-boundaries. However, it is essential to understand the ground reality. Are we in a position to say that employment is synonymous to empowerment? As women have stepped out of home in large numbers, have men stepped inside the home in an appreciable manner? This paper attempts to talk about such pressing issues, which even though not talked about seriously, confront women today.  

Meeta Virmani and Yatika Arya
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 63-67

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Preventive Detention: A Necessity

Abstract

State, ever since, its emergence, has been concerned with the maintenance of law and order and protecting people from external aggression and internal threats, thereby, ensuring safety and security to its inhabitants. The authority to maintain law and order empowers the state to use coercive power. It also emanates from various laws that are enacted from time to time. More often than not, coercive laws are self-contradictory because on the one hand they guarantee rights to people and on the other hand, they take away the right of a person or persons. Therefore, it is not wrong to say that modern states are repository of contradictions and India is no exception. There are several undemocratic provisions in the Indian Constitution; preventive detention is one of them. It seeks to detain a person to prevent him/her from indulging in any activity which is likely to pose a threat to the security of the State. In Britain and America this provision was used during World War II while, in India it can be used even in peacetime. This provision has been extensively used against the political dissidents during the post-colonial period. Justice Mahajan of the Supreme Court of India has held that ‘preventive detention laws are repugnant to democratic constitution and they cannot be found to exist in any of the democratic countries of the world’. The question that one can ask at this juncture is that why did the Government of ‘independent’ India retain preventive detention laws? And further, framed new ones. This research contribution examines the circumstances which compelled the Government to frame ‘preventive detention’ laws, and its use during national emergency and peace time.  

Jaya Mishra
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 68-71

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Change in Geographical Proximity: A Qualitative Study of the Experience of Parting

Abstract

The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychological impact on individuals that results from a change in geographic proximity of a close friend, romantic partner and a sibling. The topic was chosen in light of personal experiences, that is, deep affiliation with friends, and the subsequent experience of parting. A total of 6 participants (1 male and 1 female in each of the three categories), aged between 19 to 26 years were selected purposively. Out of these, 2 had experienced change in geographic proximity from a friend and 2 from a romantic partner and 2 from a sibling. The study provides an insight into the experiences of those who deal with the process of a romantic partner, friend or sibling moving away. The participants identified had experienced change in geographic proximity of friend, romantic partner or sibling within a period of 1 to 8 months. The various aspects explored were communication, well-being, loneliness, transition in feelings, coping with stress, significant experiences, etc. The data were collected using a semi structured interview, and was transcribed and analysed through thematic analysis.  

Urvashi Dixit and Sabreen Kaur
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 72-79

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Gandhian Naturopathy: A Critical Appraisal

Abstract

Seeking an alternative to Allopathic Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi, a champion of peace and non-violence, tested natural remedies on himself and his followers throughout his life. This paper revisits the system of Medicine which Gandhi practiced and promoted, what he called Naturopathy or nature-cure. Gandhi’s complex thoughts are often reduced to binaries like Indian versus Western, modern versus traditional, scientific versus irrational, secular versus faith-based. This paper questions these binaries, and attempts to highlight that Gandhian Naturopathy goes beyond them. The paper is an attempt to enrich the understanding of Gandhi’s philosophy through the study of his ideas on Medicine.  

Nivedita Tuli
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 80-85

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General Article


Reflecting on the Relationship Between Human Beings and Sparrows

Abstract

The Birdman of India, Salim Moizuddin Abdul Ali, was one of the first Indians to conduct a systematic and patterned survey of birds in India. W.S. Millard, the Secretary of the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) had introduced Salim Ali to the beautiful world of the birds. Millard had identified an unusually coloured sparrow that was actually shot by a young Salim Ali with his air gun. This was a yellow-throated sparrow. Following this, Millard showed Salim Ali the Society’s collection of stuffed birds, and this became the beginning of a marvelous journey of exploring the bird kingdom and establishing great landmarks by Salim Ali. The sparrow had transformed Salim Ali’s world. Undoubtedly, his autobiography was later titled ‘The Fall of a Sparrow’. Salim Ali has very carefully noted in his autobiography as to how this yellow-throated sparrow became the turning point in his life that led him into the fascinating world of ornithology. This research contribution is not about the birdman but the bird, which is rapidly vanishing from our vicinity. The reasons for the decline of the sparrow are varied but the fact of the matter is that the natural world around us is rapidly receding. And the decline of the sparrow is an alarm, a warning against the degrading ecosystems, and an alarm against blind-folded urbanisation which is leading to human-induced disasters.  

Jyoti Trehan Sharma and Harsh Bala Sharma
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 86-90

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Research Communication


Towards A Waste Neutral College Campus: Case Study of Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi

Abstract

Waste management refers to collection, transportation, monitoring, disposal or recycling of waste. The present paper provides a brief account of waste management practices adopted by Indraprastha College for Women, University of Delhi. Effective waste management at the institutional level is an important contribution towards sustainable development. The present paper uses key respondent data and personal observations to understand the dynamics of waste generation and waste management practices adopted by the institution. Highlighting the various outcomes and benefits of waste management at an institutional level, this research communication emphasises the importance of waste management in educational institutions. The paper shows how waste management is not only an important social responsibility of the institution but also goes a long way in promoting environmental consciousness among the students.  

Surabhika Maheshwari
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 91-94

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Seeding Social Innovation in Private Schools: A Case Study of St. Mary’s School, Delhi, India

Abstract

Education has an important role in creating new learning opportunities and driving social progress. As social institutions, schools form a fundamental block to understand about life and society. While schools have done a good job in preparing students for life and society, newer challenges facing humanity have now emerged. How can schools meaningfully engage students on various pressing social issues and empower their students to take action on issues like environmental crisis, social injustice and developmental challenges? Current school curriculum does not provide adequate opportunities where students can experiment and explore these issues and look for solutions. Problem identifications and their solutions can be explored by creating an interface between community and school. This would create an open space for creativity and innovation amongst students to explore, develop and understand social issues. Such practices would further fuel the students to think and act to address social and environmental challenges. Such approach will pave the way for students to implement and share innovative solutions rather than simply limiting their knowledge to the classroom. This paper is an attempt to highlight the initiatives taken by St. Mary’s School (Delhi, India) under its social footprint projects and social innovation in the context of community engagement and emerging environmental issues.  

Niket Sagar
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 95-98

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Roaming Through Hafta Bazaar: A Walk-Route for Old Delhi’s Sunday Markets

Abstract

Delhi is well positioned in the tourism circuit. However, the heritage monuments are over-crowded especially during the weekends. The potential of weekly market (Hafta Bazaar) as a combination of cultural and heritage tourism is hitherto unexplored and can augment Delhi’s tourism space. This research contribution attempts to document the weekly markets of Delhi. Sunday Markets around Old Delhi have been identified and mapped since this is one part of the city visited by large number of tourist groups. Developing these markets for tourists, by combining their historical, cultural and architectural heritage, and addition of photography or culinary delicacies in these walks could open up a new avenue for the tourists as well as tour operators.  

Abhishek K. Sharma, Abhishek K. Singh, Ashish K. Yadav, Ayush Shukla, Kirti Krishan, Shubhrat Katiyar
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 99-101

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Book Review


Spiritual Ecology and Sustainability: Practice and Confluence. Prem Kumari Srivastava, Pratibha Rai & Saumya Shukla. New Delhi: AuthorsPress, 2017, p. 256

Anjali Sharma
Journal of Innovation for Inclusive Development. August 2017 2(2): 102-103

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JIID has been set up as a platform for researchers from all disciplines conducting innovative research for ensuring inclusive development.

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